Good Marketing. Poor Author Website Design. Does It Matter?

beverly-ovalle-author-website-designI stumbled across an article today from a local newspaper published in Wisconsin. It’s a personal profile on a local author, Beverly Ovalle.

If you’re interested in reading the full story, you can find it here. But, in short, it talks about how she became an author, the books that she’s written that are selling well on Amazon, and the various marketing efforts she’s using to promote her books, including Facebook and Twitter. She also joined the Romance Writers of America and the Wisconsin Writers Association and ROMVETS, a group of women veterans who write romances. She even entered one of her books in a contest (which it didn’t win).

There’s nothing about her story that’s shocking or exceptional. She’s an average person who tried her hand at writing, invested some time and energy in promoting her books and did pretty well.

Just the fact that I found this article means that she was able to pitch her story to the local paper and get it picked up. This is some great publicity for her! So she’s really doing something right.

But as I dug into her efforts, one thing caught my eye … and not in a good way: her website.

What’s Wrong With Her Author Website Design?

When I clicked through to her site, my first reaction was that it looked … well … amateurish. Here it is. Take a look for yourself: www.beverlyovalle.com.

It’s not awful, but it didn’t exactly blow my socks off either. My first guess was that she had designed it herself. And as I scrolled to the bottom, I found that I was pretty much correct. Right where the credit to the design team usually goes, it says it was “proudly created with Wix.com.”

For those of you who don’t know, Wix is a free website design service. It allows you to pick a website template and then customize it to your needs. The templates themselves aren’t bad. The problem is usually the customization.

In this particular case, Beverly decided that she was going to make the website look exciting and splashy. She wanted to add boxes that feature news, have words/image moving around, etc… None of these are bad things in and of themselves. It’s just that when the things that you’re adding are self-made — not made by a professional designer — they can fall flat. That was my reaction when I saw Beverly’s site.

When you work with a professional design team, (like us — the perfect time for a plug) you get a full package of design services. We start by helping you choose a template, and then we work with you to customize it to your needs. If you want splashy, you’ll get splashy. And you’ll get it with the professionalism of a true designer. You’ll also get lots of expert advice on what works and what doesn’t for other authors. We’re not afraid to push back on an idea if we think it won’t convey what you want it to convey. That’s the personalized service you get with a professional author website design firm, and not with a free service like Wix.

So here’s my question for you …

Does It Really Matter?

Clearly, Beverly is doing a lot of things right. She’s selling copies of her book. She’s active on social media. She got the local paper to cover her story. So her website is less than ideal in terms of its design and functionality. Does that matter? Is that hindering her success?

Ultimately, that’s for each and every author to decide for him or herself. Some might argue that getting a professionally designed website is a waste of money. I can’t argue that’s wrong. But I can tell you this. If I looked at Beverly’s site and thought it was missing something, then what reaction would agents have when they take a look? What about publishers? How about readers? You know what they say about first impressions.

What do you think? Is having a professionally designed author website important? Share your thoughts below!

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