author page deidre havrelock

Your Author Page: 5 Questions to Ask Yourself

So you’ve decided to build an author website. Among other things, that website will include an author page.

First, let’s define what an author page is. In it’s simplest terms, it’s the section of your website in which you would include information about yourself — like where you’re from, what your background is, why you write, etc…

But an author page can be much more than that. In this post, I explore a few different approaches to a successful author page, and examples of people who have done interesting things with theirs.

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Creating Your Author Page

author page ig hughes1. Should I write it in the first person or the third person?
This may seem like a silly question. After all, a whopping majority of bios are written in the third person. But not everyone’s is. In fact, some might argue that an author page that has a bio written in the first person is a bit warmer and more welcoming than the traditional bio. After all, you might feel like “Judy Adams” is really talking to you if she says, “I have the most adorable little puppy dog named Larry,” as opposed to reading a sentence like, “Jane lives with her husband and puppy.” It’s really a personal preference thing, and obviously would not be applicable to someone who wants to maintain a more business/professional writer profile.

See examples of a few author bios written in the first person:

author page alison kartevold2. Should I include a photo? If so, what kind?
Yes, you should include a photo. Obviously, there are people who — for whatever reason — really don’t want their picture out there. And that’s fine. But know that your readers are going to want to see a picture (or multiple pictures) of you on your author page. As far as what type of picture to include, I’ve seen all sorts. Some of them are casual. Some of them are more professional. In general, I lean toward recommending that an author have some professional photos taken for this purpose. After all, this is an impression on your readers and you want it to be a good one.

See a few examples of good author photos:

3. What kind of information about myself can (or should) I share?
Again, this is a personal preference thing. It also depends on the genre of your writing. For example, if you’re writing a book chock full of financial advice, then you want to use your author page to talk about your background in finance and what makes you qualified to write such a book. A different type of nonfiction author — say, one who writes about history — would want to talk about what made them interested in history in the first place, why they felt compelled to write this book and retell a story, etc…

A fiction author, on the other hand, probably has less to talk about as it relates specifically to the subject matter of the book. So her bio might be a little more personal, like what novels she likes to read, her hobbies, where she grew up, if any of the characters in her book are based on real-life people, etc…

Here are a few in particular that I like:

author page deidre havrelock4. Should I format it like an interview?
I’ve seen a few authors go this direction with their bio. And I think it’s an interesting one, so I’m including it here. It allows the author to tell his story in the form of questions and answers, instead of a traditional bio.

See two examples here:

5. What else can I do on my author page that’s unique?
I’ve seen author pages include “10 things you don’t know about me.” I’ve seen others that include video of an author talking about him/herself, comic strips, the author’s life in chapters and more. Think outside the box about how you can really connect with your audience and stay true to your brand. Then get creative!

See examples of a few such authors who really “got creative” with their author page:

Hopefully a few of these will spark ideas for you. But if I had one word of advice about building your author bio page it would be this: make your author page your own. Make sure the format and the photos reflect who you are. Your readers will appreciate it.

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One Comment

  1. You may want to explore the whole idea of Mary and the Catholic Church: The book of Revelation has a lot to say about the Catholic Church’s final outcome. It is a beast with two horns as lamb but spoke like a dragon. The Catholic Church, just the world, is not what people think it is: It is an illusion–a very cruel one at that. The symbolisms of the Catholic Church are the same as those of Islam. As it turns out, the more you dig into the Catholic Church, the more frustrating information you will find.

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