An Author Website Book Publishers Will Love

I work with authors at all different stages of publication. Some who are self publishing. Others who reach out to me when their books are only a few months away from release through a major publishing house. The saddest of all are the authors whose books came out six months ago, and only now are they realizing how little publicity their book publishers are doing for them.

But some authors actually reach out to me way sooner than that. In fact, many of them haven’t even finished their manuscript yet.

How Soon Is Too Soon to Build an Author Website?

I’ve written about this before. It’s honestly never too soon. But be aware that the website you build prior to finishing your book is going to be drastically different from what it will be a year later. Once you have a finished book (and cover), book reviews, testimonials, links to buy it, etc… the site will look different because your goals will be different. At that point, you will be aiming to get readers to buy your book. But now, you have nothing to buy.

That doesn’t mean, however, that you shouldn’t have a site this early in the process. Building an online presence is an important piece of being a successful author today, and that’s something that takes time.

So What’s the Site for If It’s Not Selling Books?

Well, some of that depends on if you’re self publishing or reaching out to book publishers. In the case of traditional publishing, you want to make sure that when the person who receives your book pitch takes a look at your site, they are impressed and think, “Now, that’s an author I want to get behind.” More on that below.

Obviously, if you’re planning to self publish, you will be less focused on appealing to book publishers. But in many ways, the goals of the site would still be the same.

This early in the journey, the goal of your author website should be to build a following. That can be done in a few different ways, including:

  • Blogging regularly
  • Driving traffic to the site through Facebook/Twitter
  • Collecting email addresses and building fans/followers
  • Optimizing your site for search terms that readers might be looking for

So What Type of Site Would Appeal to Book Publishers?

Author websites for book publishers

Image courtesy of adamr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Put yourself in the shoes of someone who is receiving your manuscript. Let’s call her Jane.

Picture this scenario….

Jane comes across your book pitch. She sees your name and does a Google search for you.

Does your site show up right at the top of search results for your name?

Jane is now clicking around your site. The first thing she wants to know is if this site looks clean and professional.

Did you have it designed by a professional? Is it mobile-friendly?

Jane now wants to know what you look like. After all, she likes to attach a face to a name and is curious whether you’re 25 or 65.

Do you have a professional photo of yourself on the site?

Now, Jane is going to take a look at your blog. She wants to know what you write about, how dedicated you seem to be to it, and if people seem to be visiting it regularly.

Do you post entries on your blog on a regular basis? Are people commenting, and are you replying?

While she’s at it, Jane wants to get an idea of if you’ve already built a list of followers/subscribers. The more people you already have following you the easier it will be to sell the book to a larger audience once it’s published.

Do you prominently collect email addresses on the site? Do you have a social widget that shows how many followers/fans you already have?

Now, let’s not forget your writing. Jane knows that your book pitch is good, but how does she know that you did that yourself and didn’t hire someone? She wants to know what writing you’ve done in the past and where you might have been published.

Do you have a page on your site dedicated to previous writings (articles, book chapters, etc…) and a place where they can be read? Do you highlight any writing awards you’ve received?

 

If you answered yes to most of the questions above, a book publisher like Jane is more likely to take you seriously. Now, that doesn’t mean she’s going to publish your book. That’s still a ways away. But if, at the end of the day, she’s deciding between two promising authors and you’ve checked more boxes above than the other author she’s considering, you have a serious advantage.

Happy site building!

facebook author page

Author Page: 5 Sites You Should Consider Having One On

I often hear the term “author page” thrown around by clients as something they should have. I think it’s important that I first define what an author page is — and why it’s not the same thing as an author website.

The term author page refers to one page on the web that is dedicated to an individual author. It generally highlights who they are, what they write about, and why a reader might be interested in becoming a fan. This is not to be confused with an author site, which is generally comprised of many elements.

With that in mind, here are five sites that you should consider having an author page on (and tips on how to maximize each one).

Sites for Your Author Page

1. Your author website. As I alluded to above, an author page is a subset of an author site. Think of it like a thumb being a type of finger. You have five fingers on your hand, one of them is a thumb. You have an author website with many pages, one of them being an author page. Your entire site will likely be comprised of a blog, pages dedicated to your books, a contact page, a media page, etc… And yes, an author page.

Tip: Learn more about how to create a great author bio on your own website.

amazon author page2. Amazon. If you have books for sale on Amazon, you absolutely need an author page on Amazon as well. This will allow your name (wherever it appears on Amazon) to serve as a link to your author page. Once someone arrives there, they can view your photo, your bio, a list of all your books available for sale, and highlights of the reviews your books have gotten on Amazon. It essentially becomes a one-stop shop where people can learn more about you and your writing. And best of all, it’s free. You can start by joining Amazon Author Central.

Tip: In addition to all the basic information, your Amazon author page can also be customized to include a blog feed (pulling in your most recent blog entries), details on upcoming book tours, and any video you’ve created. Plus, on the back end, it allows you to access a book sales tracker and see how your books are doing in real time.

3. GoodReads. Much like Amazon, building an author page on GoodReads is free. All you have to do is join their author program. By creating this page, you are essentially claiming your space on GoodReads. Not only will this mean people learning about your books will also be able to learn about you, but it will also provide you with the official Goodreads Author badge that will appear anywhere you post on the site — like answering reader questions or reviewing other books in your genre. Fans will then also be able to follow you on Goodreads.

Tip: There are various book marketing tools that also become available when you build an author page on GoodReads, like being able to run a book giveaway or advertise your books through the site.

facebook author page4. Facebook. You probably already have a personal profile on Facebook. But what you may not have is an author page. And it’s important that you understand the difference. Unlike a Facebook profile, which is for an individual and allows you to friend people, like posts, etc… a Facebook page is defined as “a business account that represents a company or organization. [It] allows businesses to promote specials and contests to followers who have engaged with their page by ‘liking’ it.” In this case, your business is your authorship, and it needs a page that both friends and fans can follow. Another way to put it is that while your Facebook profile has friends, your Facebook page has followers. This is also free to create.

Tip: Make sure to take advantage of Facebook Insights, which you get when you set up an author page. It allows you to track how successful your social media efforts are. It also allows you to schedule posts in advance, launch contests, or run Facebook ads (not free).

5. Your publisher’s site Depending on who published your book — and even if you published it yourself — the publisher’s site is likely to have a place where you can create your own author page. This probably won’t be your most heavily-trafficked author page, but there’s no harm in getting it set up. Make sure to ask your publisher or self-publishing company if and how you can go about creating this page on their site.

Tip: Given the fact that you’re unlikely to spend a lot of time working on maintaining this author page, I highly recommend that you work in a link to your author website somewhere on the page. That way, a visitor who wants to stay on top of what you’re doing knows where to go.

Which author page worked best for you? What tips would you give other authors? Share them with us!

stopwatch-to-speed-up-your-author-website

7 Ways to Speed Up Your Author Website

stopwatch-to-speed-up-your-author-websiteSo your site is loading slowly. You’re not alone. Nearly everyone — from time to time — has dealt with a slow-loading site that is turning off potential readers. In fact, here’s a stat that you should be aware of: according to a report by the Microsoft Bing search team, a 2-second longer delay in page responsiveness reduced user satisfaction by 3.8%, increased lost revenue per user by 4.3%, and a reduced clicks by 4.3%. So how do you speed up your author website?

If your site was built in WordPress (which most author websites are), there are some simple steps you can take to make your site load faster.

Tips to Speed Up Your Author Website (in WordPress)

1. Uninstall unused plug-ins. Each plug-in that you have slows down your site just a bit. So go through your list of installed plug-ins and remove any that you aren’t currently using.

2. Make sure your images are optimized. If you are displaying a photo at a width of, say 450 pixels, make sure that the version that you’ve uploaded is not, say, 2000 pixels. The larger the original version of the image (even if you’re not displaying it at its full size) the longer the page will take to load.

3. Consider choosing a lighter WordPress theme. The more designed (i.e. full of code) your site is, the longer it takes to load. Consider switching to a faster theme. You’ll have fewer bells and whistles in the design, but it can be much more functional.

4. Install a caching plug-in. Okay, this probably sounds contrary to the “remove unused plug-ins” I discussed before, but this plug-in serves one purpose: to cache your site and improve site speed. One that is frequently recommended is W3 Total Cache.

5. Reduce content on your homepage. Each element on your homepage is its own widget. So if, for example, you have an introductory paragraph, a feed of your most recent blog posts, followed by a slider of photos, etc… each one of those is its own widget, and each comes with a boatload of code. If you can simplify/reduce the amount of content on your homepage, you can drastically increase load time.

6. Optimize your WordPress database. Yes, this is yet another plug-in. But I promise. These are helpful. This one helps optimize all your files to help reduce site load time. So if you have, say, 10 drafts of an old blog post or 100 spam comments in the system, those might be slowing down your site. Try the WP-Optimize plug-in.

7. Consider changing web hosts. This is probably your least attractive option. Because, let’s face it, who wants to have to move to a new host? But if all of the above options don’t work, the problem may just be your server. If so, it might be worth moving your site to a new host that gets good reviews from users on site speed.

It’s important to know that you can always track your progress on site speed as you take each of these steps. Use Google PageSpeed Insights to get real-time data on your load time (both on desktop and mobile) and watch your numbers increase.

Happy (and speedy) loading.

good reads for authors

March in Review: 5 Good Reads for Authors

good reads for authorsHappy April! Here’s what you might have missed in March. It’s time to catch up on your reading. Presenting … 5 Good Reads for Authors

Good Reads for Authors, March 2017

1. Should Indie Authors Publish Exclusively With Amazon or Not?
A new report from Author Earnings doesn’t completely answer the question, but it will help writers decide.
March 6, 2017 | Observer

2. 6 book publishing models in 2017
Discover today’s six book publishing models and get advice on how to figure out whose book publishing advice you can trust
March 8, 2017 | Build Book Buzz

3. The Indie Author’s Guide to Paid Reviews
For indie authors who have some room in their marketing budgets, paid book review services can be an appealing option.
March 10, 2017 | Publishers Weekly

4. Why Is It Important to Write Unique Blog Content?
There will always be room for another blog, but you cannot get away with poorly written content anymore. Writing unique and informative posts is where the money is at.
March 17, 2017 | Just Publishing Advice

4. Author Marketing Plans: Why Yours Should Be Unique
Are you looking for ready-made author marketing plans? Hoping to find a simple checklist that tells you everything you need to do to get your book out there to a wide audience? Well, sorry … I have some bad news for you.
March 23, 2017 | Smart Author Sites

author marketing plans

Author Marketing Plans: Why Yours Should Be Unique

Are you looking for ready-made author marketing plans? Hoping to find a simple checklist that tells you everything you need to do to get your book out there to a wide audience? Well, sorry … I have some bad news for you.

Why Author Marketing Plans Need to Be Customized

author marketing plans

Image courtesy of jk1991 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

No two books are alike. No two authors are alike. And the audience for one book will be drawn to things that are drastically different from the audience for another book.

Here’s are two examples (note: these are completely made up):

Judy Smith: A children’s book author who writes a series for girls ages 8-10 about tween drama.

Mike Jones: A historian who writes biographies about war heroes in American history.

What would you recommend as a “standard” marketing plan for these two authors? What things should they both be doing?

Sure, some of it would be the same. Yes, they each need an ISBN. And yes, likely an author website and/or a Facebook page. But beyond that? Almost nothing about their author marketing plans would be the same.

Some examples of what Judy’s author marketing plans might include are:

  • A press release speaking to teachers/librarians about her series
  • A presence on Instagram/Facebook (to reach moms)
  • Fun online games on her website for girls in her target age group
  • Offering free copies to parents she knows and asking them to spread the word
  • A fun book launch party at her local community center, dance school or gymnastics school
  • Speaking engagements at elementary schools in her area

And Mike’s author marketing plan might involve:

  • Local events at libraries/senior centers
  • Book readings for local veteran’s groups
  • A presence on GoodReads, speaking to those who are interested in history
  • A comprehensive SEO strategy to drive traffic to his author website when people search for terms surrounding historical war heroes
  • Some targeted ads on Facebook for those with an interest in the topic

See? Night and day.

One Example of a Unique Author Marketing Plan

guy-garcia-swarmI recently came across this article about a bestselling author using virtual reality as a marketing tool for his book. I must admit that I had never thought about this as an option for authors, but it made all the sense in the world.

Guy Garcia’s new book, entitled Swarm, is described as a fast-paced, action-packed novel with an undercurrent of technology, showing how its evolution is faster than we, as people can absorb or understand —  and how it’s changing us in ways we can’t possibly predict.

So, of course, people who are interested in that type of book would be attracted to virtual reality. Hence his idea to use VR as a marketing tool.

In the VR experience he created to promote this book, he allows readers to “enter Swarm’s virtual reality” and “bring readers inside the mind of a character who is born online and rules a digital realm with the power to transform the real world.”

Here are a few quotes from him about how he came up with this idea and why….

“The key to marketing your book is embedded in your characters, and your story and the emotions and ideas that drove you to write the book in the first place … That’s your audience, find out what they do and where they are and go after them.”

“You are the best salesperson to represent your ideas and passion, and the most convincing billboard for why people should pay for the privilege of reading your work.”

Swarm, because of its subject matter and story line, is inherently suited for mixed reality marketing platforms, but marketing books of any kind with only standard ad and promotion channels in mind is a limiting strategy, full of missed opportunities.”

How to Create Your Own Author Marketing Plans

Not having much knowledge myself about virtual reality or the genre of his book, this is not an idea I ever could have come up with myself. But as Guy says himself, YOU are the best person to come up with your marketing plan.

In other words, you may have a wonderful team of people that can create your online presence for you, write press releases, and try to spread the word about your book. But no one knows your genre or your audience better than you do. And the best ideas about how to reach them in a new and unique way is likely floating around in your mind.

Here are five things to keep in mind as you try to come up with your own version of the virtual reality idea…

  1. Who is reading your book? How old are they? What gender are they?
  2. Where are these people spending their leisure time? Online? At a senior center?
  3. What is it about your book that appeals most to them?
  4. What can you offer them that’s different and unique?
  5. What do you know that your readers would like to know? How can you share that with them?
  6. How can you take advantage of technology to connect with them?

Again, I can’t spell out your author marketing plans. I don’t know your book, your subject matter, or your audience the way you do. Nor can I create a templated list of items that each and every author should check off to promote their books.

Instead, I hope this advice will help spark ideas for you to put together your own successful marketing plan. Good luck!

author website domain name

Author Website Domain Name: 5 Fast Facts

author website domain name

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It’s the first thing you need to do when you are building an author website: choose a domain name! And yet, many people get tripped up by the experience. Here are five fast facts that may help make the process of choosing an author website domain name a little bit smoother and easier.

1. An author website domain name costs very little.

While building and hosting a site may come with some cost, a domain name shouldn’t break the bank. For about $15/year you can purchase your domain. So even if the domain you purchase isn’t the perfect one, that’s okay. Don’t let anyone try to charge you an arm and a leg for it.

2. Your domain name is not the same as your site hosting.

In order for your website to be live online, it will have to be hosted somewhere. Think of that as paying rent for your space on the internet. But well before you get there, you need to have your domain name purchased. One common misconception among authors is that their author website domain name and hosting are one in the same. They are not. The two entities — both of which are required to have a functioning site — can be purchased through the same company, but they don’t have to be. And, too often, an author only remembers their login for their domain name and not their site hosting, or vice versa. These are two very distinct items. Think of one as the copyright to your book (the domain) and one the book itself (the hosting.)

3. You can purchase multiple domain names.

I’ve worked with many authors who purchase multiple domains and have them all point to the same site. That’s perfectly fine. If you want to purchase your name at .net, .com and .org, great. If you want both your name and each of your book titles to all be domains that take people to your author site, that’s totally doable. You will need to select one primary domain (the one that is visible to your audience), but there’s no limit to how many domains you can purchase. Any time someone enters any one of those domains, they will end up on your website.

4. Unless it’s not available, your author website domain name should match the name on your book cover.

Let’s say you go by the name of Joe, but your book is published under Joseph. Or you use your middle initial on your book cover. In those instances, what do you do? Do you reserve a domain by the name people know you as? Or by the one you’ve published under? Again, you can purchase multiple domains, so in many cases I would recommend both. But your primary domain — the one that people see — should match as closely as possible to your author name. Now, if you have a relatively common name, like Joseph Smith, you may have to get more creative. So JosephSmith.com may not be available, but you can always try JosephSmithBooks.com, AuthorJosephSmith.com, etc…

5. You should ALWAYS own your own domain.

I can’t stress this to authors enough. Never let another organization purchase your domain name for you. They might build your website and own the rights to all your files. They might host your site. But at the end of the day, your author website domain name has to be yours. If at some point you decide to terminate the relationship with whomever built your site, you want to have full control over that domain. Because, if you own it, you can always have a new site built under that domain. If someone else owns it, they essentially own your brand and can do with it as they wish. That’s a marketing no-no for authors.

Hopefully, this has cleared up some confusion you might have had about author website domain names. If you have any additional questions, feel free to post them in the comments box below and I will be happy to provide a response! Or feel free to contact us for a free consultation.

vanity publishing and self publishing

Vanity Publishing and Self Publishing: What’s the Difference?

vanity publishing and self publishing

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last decade, you know a fair amount about self publishing. And if you’re over the age of 40, you probably have heard about vanity publishing as well — and likely not in a positive way. Just the name itself is awful (who thought that “vanity” was a good name to put in anything?!?!) But, in all seriousness, what’s the difference between vanity publishing and self publishing? Is there one, or has the industry simply undergone a name change?

What Are They?

Let’s start with simple definitions of each one.

A vanity publishing company is a business that an author can pay to essentially be their book publisher.

A self-publishing company is a business that gives authors the ability to publish their books themselves and pick and choose the needed services to do so.

Vanity Publishing and Self Publishing: What’s the Same

In many ways, self publishing is simply an evolution of what used to be called vanity publishing, but incorporating much of the 21st century technology available to authors. Here is what the two still have in common:

  • They allow authors to publish books themselves, without going through a traditional publishing company.
  • They involve some sort of financial investment from the author.
  • Marketing and sales of the book sit exclusively with the author.

And yet, in many ways, these businesses are very, very different.

Vanity Publishing and Self Publishing: What’s Different?

So now we get into the nitty gritty of what differentiates vanity publishing from self publishing. These are important differences that you need to know before choosing a publishing route.

  • Vanity presses have been around for nearly a half century, while self publishing is relatively new in comparison — only a few decades old.
  • Vanity presses almost always offer “cover to cover” service — everything from editing to cover design to book binding. Self publishing companies may or may not offer such services, and authors who are self publishing are less likely to rely on their publisher for such services.
  • Given the age of the medium, vanity publishing still offers books primarily in print. Self publishing allows you to print books, offer e-books, or both.
  • Vanity presses usually require more money up-front from an author. This makes sense, since their services are far more complete.
  • Here’s a really important one … If you go through a vanity publisher, that publisher will assign your book an ISBN number that belongs to them. This makes them the publisher of record and they may or may not collect additional royalty whenever that book sells. They will, forever and ever, own the rights to that book. A book that is self-published, on the other hand, is fully owned by the author.

Vanity Publishing and Self Publishing: Which Should You Choose?

Almost everyone will tell you that self publishing is the way to go. It offers you far more flexibility than vanity publishing, and — most importantly — allows you to retain the rights to your book in perpetuity. You should definitely lean towards a self publishing company if you:

  • Want to offer your book in multiple formats
  • Have the goal of publishing multiple books and/or becoming a bestselling author
  • Want some flexibility in terms of costs and services

However, that doesn’t mean vanity publishing should be excluded in all circumstances. Vanity publishing may do the trick if, for example, you:

  • Want to print a book that is exclusively for a small audience (i.e. an autobiography or family cookbook that you want passed down for generations)
  • Don’t want to invest a whole lot of time and energy in getting the book published
  • Don’t mind putting some money down up front

Hopefully, this has helped you understand the similarities and differences between the two industries and it will help you make the right choice for getting your book out there in the world.

articles for authors

Articles for Authors: What You Might Have Missed in February

articles for authors

Image courtesy of adamr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Happy March, everyone.  Since February came and went so quickly, you may have missed some of these really helpful articles for authors – put together from various places across the web. Here are five our our favorites.

5 Must-Read Articles for Authors

  1. The Indie Author’s Guide to Customer Reviews
    How indie authors can turn that discouraging “no customer reviews yet” message into star ratings and commentary.
    Publishers Weekly, February 1, 2017
  2. Are You Confusing Your Readers?
    Here are five signs you might be confusing readers with your book’s category and description. If you confuse readers, you’ll also cripple sales.
    Build Book Buzz, February 8, 2017
  3. Writing an Effective Book Description: 7 Ways to Turn Browsers Into Buyers
    Today I share 7 tips on how to write a book description that will turn browsers into buyers.
    Karen Woodward, February 14, 2017
  4. The 7 Benefits Of Inviting Guest Authors To Your Blog
    Attracting guest posts to your blog, written by outsiders, is a strategy of enormous potential value. Here are seven reasons why.
    Forbes, February 15, 2017
  5. I Want to Stop Blogging. Now What?
    Here are three questions I frequently get when people want to stop blogging, and what you as an author need to know about cutting ties with your blog.
    Smart Author Sites, February 16, 2017

Happy Reading!

author who wants to stop blogging

I Want to Stop Blogging. Now What?

author who wants to stop blogging

Image courtesy of jk1991 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I’ve been building websites for authors for over a decade. Many of them were built with blogs. So it’s not surprising that after all this time, I occasionally get the question, “I want to stop blogging. Is that okay? Will it hurt book sales?”

Look, unless you are a professional blogger with a following in the thousands, the chances are that you are not going to be inclined or inspired to continue blogging for more than a few years. Eventually, that fire burns out.

Here are three questions I frequently get when people want to stop blogging, and what you as an author need to know about cutting ties with your blog.

1. Can I just stop blogging cold turkey? Should I notify my followers?

Yes, you absolutely can just quit if you want. There’s nothing stopping you. If you’re done, you’re done.

However, it’s probably a good idea for you to thank your followers by writing a last post that explains why you’re going to “take a break” from blogging. I would refrain from saying that you’re quitting for good — you never know when you might get the urge again. Some followers might be disappointed, but they’ll understand.

2. Should I shut down my blog completely?

If you no longer want to be responsible for maintaining a domain name, site hosting, images, etc… you certainly can. That’s especially true if you’re walking away from writing altogether and get no benefit from eyeballs on your site.

But my strong recommendation is that you leave your blog as it is and simply let your already-created posts continue to live on. Here’s why.

All of your previous blog posts have been submitted to Google, and are likely already showing up on some people’s search results. That’s the result of the work that you put into them. Ditto with any links to your blog posts from other sites, social shares, etc… If you take your blog down completely, you will lose all those placements. If you do nothing and just allow the posts to live on in infamy, you’ll still get traffic to them. And as long as there’s a plug for your book on the pages where those blog posts live, you’ll still potentially generate sales from them.

Now here’s the tricky part: if your blog is a stand-alone entity (i.e. its own domain name), there’s little reason why you should change anything after you stop blogging. Just let it sit. If, however, your blog is a section of a larger author website that you want to maintain, my recommendation is that you keep the blog posts living, but take the links to your blog off the site. In other words, if “blog” was one of the tabs in your navigation, have it removed. You certainly don’t want a user coming to the site, clicking on a “blog” link and seeing that you haven’t updated it in several years. Just removing that link should rid you of the problem.

3. How will it impact traffic to my website and/or book sales if I stop blogging?

I’d be lying if I said there would be no impact at all if you stopped blogging. Just having regularly-published content that is optimized for the search engines drives additional traffic to your site. There’s no question about that. And since traffic = book sales, you may see a small hit there as well.

But the impact might not be quite as huge as you fear. After all, if you keep your old blog posts alive, the equity that those have built over time will still be sending traffic your way. In addition, if you maintain your author website apart from the blog, that will continue to generate some of the traffic you had before — especially if people are searching for your name or your book title.

Just how much your site traffic and book sales are impacted can vary when you stop blogging — depending on how much you relied on your blog for site traffic before. If nothing else, take a short time off of blogging and assess the difference before deciding whether to quit altogether.

——————

So, in short, if you want to stop blogging, here are my key takeaways for you:

  • Don’t take the blog down completely. You don’t want to lose the equity you’ve built over time.
  • Look at it as taking a break from blogging. You can always change your mind later if you’re re-inspired, or if you see that your traffic is significantly impacted.
  • Remove any links to your blog from your author website. You don’t want to drive people to something outdated.
good reads for authors

Good Reads for Authors from January (No Pun Intended)

good reads for authors

Image courtesy of bplanet at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Another month has come and gone. And with that in mind, here’s a list of the good reads (and no, I don’t mean GoodReads) for authors and writers that were published in January. If you missed any of these, now’s the time to go back and make sure you don’t miss them.

January in Review: 5 Good Reads for Authors

1. Memoir Author’s Book Marketing Success Story
Jen Miller leveraged her platform, skills, and experience to turn her memoir launch into abook marketing success story. Here’s how she did it.
BuildBookBuzz, January 4, 2017

2. Building a Platform to Land a Book Deal: Why It Often Fails
If you’re preparing to pitch your nonfiction work to agents or publishers, you’ve probably heard about the necessity of having a platform.
JaneFriedman.com, January 5, 2017

3. 8 Book Marketing Mistakes to Ban in 2017
Avoid the most common book marketing blunders made by self-publishing authors.
Reedsy.com, January 10, 2017

4. 10 Times Book Reviewers Totally Got It Wrong
I love reading book reviews but I always take them with a grain of salt. Thing is, no matter how much of an expert the reviewer is, a review is an opinion, not a fact.
#AmReading, January 24, 21017

5. Author Tip Sheet: The Whys and Hows
You may have heard about an author tip sheet, sometimes called an author sell sheet. But what in the world is it? Let’s answer some of your questions.
SmartAuthorSites.com, January 26, 2017

Happy February, everyone! If you come across other good reads for authors this month, please share them with us.