author-round-up-calendar

February Author Round-Up: 5 Things You Might Have Missed

A new month is here already. Here’s an author round up of five things you might have missed in the month of February … and that we think are definitely worth going back to author-round-up-calendarread!

1. Marketing Your Books Through Current Events
Smart Author Sites
February 11, 2016

2. 7 Proven Ways to Use Content Curation to Become a Recognized Authority in Your Industry
Donna Gunter, LinkedIn
February 17, 2016

3. 10 rock-solid reasons why authors should build an email list
Joan Stewart, Build Book Buzz
February 17, 2016

4. Good Marketing. Poor Author Website Design. Does It Matter?
Smart Author Sites
February 18, 2016

5. The Self-Publishers Guide to Marketing Author Blogs
Publishers Weekly
February 19, 2016

If you stumbled across any other good articles in February that you’d like to share with other authors, please do so!

author apps icon

The Latest Trend: Author Apps?

author apps iconYou know you need an author website. That’s what just about every successful author has nowadays. But what about an author app? Do you need one, and what should it do?

It’s a little early to answer the question about whether or not authors are benefiting from their author apps, but what we can do is take a look at author apps that have been created to date and what purpose each one serves. If you feel like one of these ideas is worth investigating for you or your books, consider consulting with an app development firm to figure out if this makes sense for you.

Here are examples of some custom author apps I’ve found so far. Each of these are uniquely built to meet the needs of an individual author and his or her readers.

  • As author of a fan fiction series, Anna Todd, has teamed up with a California-based app development firm to create an app for her After series. As it is described on HollywoodReporter.com, “The app will give fans of the After novel franchise an opportunity to collaborate with Todd on ideas for her upcoming books, including new characters and cover art. They will also be able to participate in creative contests and receive exclusive advice from Todd about how to self-publish their own work.”
  • Author Peter May created an app to support his Lewis Trilogy crime series. According to his website, the app contains, “interactive map of the islands and locations featured in the books, with photographs; audio guide to pronunciation of Gaelic words; excerpts from the 3 books in The Lewis Trilogy: The Blackhouse, The Lewis Man, The Chessmen; the background to the books; and author Peter May’s own research video of the islands.”
  • Bestselling cooking author, Mark Bittman, has created various apps that include his recipes, cooking tips and more.
  • The famous James Patterson has his own series of apps now, too. My favorite is simply known as the James Patterson app and includes, “Everything from the world’s #1 bestselling author—now in an app!”
  • Stephan Pastis, author of a syndicated comic strip, Pearls Before Swine, released an app that includes, “250 of the best Pearls Before Swine strips in full color, handpicked by Stephan; 125 integrated audio commentaries; 22 integrated videos; 12 animated strips; a window into Stephan’s creative process, inspiration for the characters and strips, and life; an interactive tour of Stephan’s studio and writing room; functionality to tag favorites and share through social media; search and bookmarking tools.” He even created a video to promote the app!

There are also companies (I have no affiliation with or knowledge of them) that help authors create templated apps — much like other web development firms help authors create websites off templates. These are obviously much less expensive than custom apps, but have limitations. Examples include:

Have you seen any author apps that you love? Have you built your own author app? Share your thoughts on this below!

beverly-ovalle-author-website-design

Good Marketing. Poor Author Website Design. Does It Matter?

beverly-ovalle-author-website-designI stumbled across an article today from a local newspaper published in Wisconsin. It’s a personal profile on a local author, Beverly Ovalle.

If you’re interested in reading the full story, you can find it here. But, in short, it talks about how she became an author, the books that she’s written that are selling well on Amazon, and the various marketing efforts she’s using to promote her books, including Facebook and Twitter. She also joined the Romance Writers of America and the Wisconsin Writers Association and ROMVETS, a group of women veterans who write romances. She even entered one of her books in a contest (which it didn’t win).

There’s nothing about her story that’s shocking or exceptional. She’s an average person who tried her hand at writing, invested some time and energy in promoting her books and did pretty well.

Just the fact that I found this article means that she was able to pitch her story to the local paper and get it picked up. This is some great publicity for her! So she’s really doing something right.

But as I dug into her efforts, one thing caught my eye … and not in a good way: her website.

What’s Wrong With Her Author Website Design?

When I clicked through to her site, my first reaction was that it looked … well … amateurish. Here it is. Take a look for yourself: www.beverlyovalle.com.

It’s not awful, but it didn’t exactly blow my socks off either. My first guess was that she had designed it herself. And as I scrolled to the bottom, I found that I was pretty much correct. Right where the credit to the design team usually goes, it says it was “proudly created with Wix.com.”

For those of you who don’t know, Wix is a free website design service. It allows you to pick a website template and then customize it to your needs. The templates themselves aren’t bad. The problem is usually the customization.

In this particular case, Beverly decided that she was going to make the website look exciting and splashy. She wanted to add boxes that feature news, have words/image moving around, etc… None of these are bad things in and of themselves. It’s just that when the things that you’re adding are self-made — not made by a professional designer — they can fall flat. That was my reaction when I saw Beverly’s site.

When you work with a professional design team, (like us — the perfect time for a plug) you get a full package of design services. We start by helping you choose a template, and then we work with you to customize it to your needs. If you want splashy, you’ll get splashy. And you’ll get it with the professionalism of a true designer. You’ll also get lots of expert advice on what works and what doesn’t for other authors. We’re not afraid to push back on an idea if we think it won’t convey what you want it to convey. That’s the personalized service you get with a professional author website design firm, and not with a free service like Wix.

So here’s my question for you …

Does It Really Matter?

Clearly, Beverly is doing a lot of things right. She’s selling copies of her book. She’s active on social media. She got the local paper to cover her story. So her website is less than ideal in terms of its design and functionality. Does that matter? Is that hindering her success?

Ultimately, that’s for each and every author to decide for him or herself. Some might argue that getting a professionally designed website is a waste of money. I can’t argue that’s wrong. But I can tell you this. If I looked at Beverly’s site and thought it was missing something, then what reaction would agents have when they take a look? What about publishers? How about readers? You know what they say about first impressions.

What do you think? Is having a professionally designed author website important? Share your thoughts below!

googletrends

Marketing Your Books Through Current Events

googletrendsQuick. Check out Google Trends. What do you see?

In case you’re not aware of Google Trends, it’s the branch of Google that shows you which search terms are being entered the most right now. And what is the thread that always seems to carry through each and every one of them? That would be news.

In other words, on the day of the Super Bowl, the most popular search terms were “Super Bowl,” “NFL,” “Denver Broncos” etc… On the day of a presidential primary, the top search terms are the names of the candidates, the state that’s voting, etc… This isn’t rocket science. People are searching for what’s top of mind that day.

So why does this matter to authors? Because taking advantage of these top trends can play a role in marketing your books. Let me explain…

Making the Connection

“What does my book have to do with today’s news?”, you might ask. For some people, making this connection is easy. If you’ve written a book on politics, it’s a no-brainer to think about how to tie your book in to the conversation surrounding the presidential election. But for a large majority of authors, this isn’t such an easy connection. That’s where your creative mind comes into play. Here are three scenarios of book topics and things in the news as I write this … and how you can link them.

Romance Novel and the Super Bowl

These two things seem to be polar opposites, correct? Well, that’s exactly where the connection lies. What a great opportunity to bring up the fact that chances are, if you’re a fan of romance novels, you are not all that into watching the Super Bowl. This is where you create, say, a live chat with the author during the Super Bowl. Or you remind people that your book is the perfect one to read while their significant others are wrapped up with football.

Psychology Book and the Presidential Election

This year’s Presidential election is … well … fascinating. We’ve got competitive candidates in both parties, Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, who are using extremely non-conventional approaches to the election. And no matter how you feel about these candidates, studying their tendencies — and their supporters’ devotion — is practically a psychology experiment. This is the perfect time for an author to step in and talk about the intensity of the feelings behind the support for these candidates. Are they feeling angry? Why? What’s the best way for them to express this anger? Is there room for personal growth for either these candidates or their followers? Or are they MORE in tune with themselves than the other candidates? Again, this is ripe conversation for fodder among authors who dabble in the spirituality/self-help/psychology arena.

Historical Biography and the Flint Water Crisis

So we’ve all heard about the awful situation in Flint, Michigan. Kids — and let’s not forget pets — are being filled with lead through the drinking water. The results are already awful, and could only get worse over time. So what does this have to do with a historical biography? Well, let’s look at the leadership in Flint, in the state of Michigan and in the US government. What are they doing to fix the problem? What caused the problem in the first place, and who is responsible? If you have written a biography on, say, John F. Kennedy, Jr., you probably know something about his position on the involvement of government in this type of issue — both on a local and national level. Maybe you even know if he worked on any bills related to clean drinking water. If nothing else, this is your opportunity to write a piece along the lines of “What Would JFK Do?” in response to this current crisis.

Obviously, you are not likely to fit into one of these three scenarios exactly. But this (hopefully) will give you some ideas about how to think outside the box and find the link.

Utilizing the Connection for Marketing Your Book

So now that you’ve found the connection, what do you do with it? Here are a few different ways to take advantage of the news cycle and use it as an opportunity to market your book. All of these routes will help — in one way or another — get a mention of your book in front of a portion of the many, many people searching for these popular keywords.

  1. Blog, blog, blog. Yup, it all goes back to blogging. This is the easiest and quickest way for you to get your message out there. Write one or more blog posts specifically tying your book to a top news story. Make sure to use specific tools/plug-ins that allow you to properly optimize the piece for those search terms. For example, here are dummy titles for each of the three scenarios outlined above:

    “Forget the Super Bowl! Read _____” (optimized for “Super Bowl”)
    “Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, and the Psychology Behind Them” (optimized for the candidates names)
    “The Flint Water Crisis: What Would JFK Do?” (optimized for “Flint water crisis”)

    By properly writing and optimizing these pieces, you can try to break through to the audience specifically looking for more on these news items. Is it easy to compete with top news organizations for these keywords? Of course not. But a good effort might just sneak you in. And if your title is interesting and clickable enough, it will attract the perfect audience of potential readers.

  2. Pitch articles. There are hundreds of sites out there just looking for good writers to pitch good story ideas to them. Giving an interesting slant to a popular news story is just icing on the cake. Think about local publications/news sites that you can easily reach out to, and also think big — like HuffPost — and pitch your ideas there as well. It may be as simple as finding other bloggers and asking them if you can guest blog on their site. Depending on the specific subject matter, identify five or so relevant sites that accept story submission ideas and make your pitch.

  3. Use social media. How many people are talking about top news items via Twitter or Facebook? That would be a lot. Just look at how many tweets were sent out during the Super Bowl. Do some quick sleuthing online to find out which hashtags are being used for tweets related to the news item you’re connecting with. Then use that tweet to inject yourself into the conversation and make the connection with your book. For example, a post that reads, “#superbowl Bored to tears? Buy an e-copy of ____ now” can reach your target audience. Ditto with Facebook … find conversations going on related to hot news items, and chime in with your quick blurb (or link to your blog post).

Again, there are a million ways you can go about this — both how you make the connection and how you get the word out. But no matter what type of book you’ve written, piggybacking on today’s hot news items can be your ticket to reaching a whole new audience.

 

january-snowman

January Round-Up: 5 Must Reads for Authors

january-snowmanHappy February. We’re now very much in the swing of 2016, with lots of news and advice for authors — both those who are self published and those taking the traditional route. In case you missed any of it, here are the must reads for authors from the last month.

1. 5 Blunders Nonfiction Authors Make
Curiouser Editing
January 7, 2016

2. How to Promote a Book Without Using Social Media
Build Book Buzz
January 13, 2016

3. 6 Questions You MUST Ask an Author Website Development Firm
Smart Author Sites
January 14, 2016

4. 6 Ways a Publisher Can Kill Your Success
Huffington Post
January 14, 2016

5. Five Marketing Models for Self-Publishing Success
Publishers Weekly
January 15, 2016

Happy writing (and marketing)!

 

journey

Marketing a Nonfiction Book: Using Your Website to Enhance the Journey

journeyI’ve said it before and I’ll continue to say it: marketing a nonfiction book is totally different from marketing fiction. In the latter, your story takes people into a fictional world that gives them a break from their daily life. In the former, you’re most likely educating people on something that will help them enhance their daily life. That’s true no matter what type of nonfiction you write: whether your book is about a war that happened hundreds of years ago, tips on home decor, or a way for people to find meaning and purpose through spirituality.

In essence, your nonfiction book provides a lesson to you readers. By the time they’re done reading it, they’ve been through a journey that has taught them something they didn’t know before. And, hopefully, that’s a journey they’re happy they took.

With that in mind, here are some interesting ways to use your website to further enhance that journey (and hopefully, increase the number of people buying your book). Depending on the subject matter of your book, one of these ideas might work better than others.

  1. Serial blog posts. You can use the material in your book (or come up with additional material) to use blog posts to help people along the way. So, for example, if your book is about how to reinvent your career midlife, you could write one blog post each week about the specific steps you have to take to get there. For example, the first post could be a brief explanation of how to do a self assessment to determine what you’re good at. The second could be full of resume-writing tips. The third about how to build a strong LinkedIn profile, etc… And by getting interested readers to your site regularly, you’re able to promote your book wherever appropriate.
  2. Weekly emails. This is building on the serial blog post idea. In this case, let’s say you write a book about getting organized. Allow your readers to sign up for your “Organization boot camp.” Each week, you would send them a separate email (these would all be pre-written, of course) with specific tips on what they could do that week in order to meet their personal organization goals. And it goes without saying … each email would tell them that they could get more detailed information from your book, along with a link to purchase it.
  3. Chapter-by-chapter discussion guides. What better way to sweeten the pot for a potential reader than to tell them that after they have purchased the book, they can come back to your site at the end of each chapter for a downloadable discussion guide that will help them better understand what they’ve absorbed. So if your book is about, say the Great Depression, the discussion guide that you offer will allow them to go on the site after reading chapter 1, and ask/answer a few questions that will help them have an even better understanding of what caused the Great Depression before moving on to the next chapter.
  4. Podcasts/videos. To say podcasts and videos are popular today would be an understatement. They are the most popular forms of media out there. So maybe you want your weekly lesson plan to be in video or podcast format instead of a written email. Maybe you want your chapter discussion guides to be actual discussions between you and another expert, talking through the most interesting things you covered in that chapter. Maybe you’re even debating the subject. Take about a great way to reinforce a concept and make the reading experience even more satisfying!
  5. Ask the expert features. People love being able to ask a question of an expert. And if you’re a nonfiction author … well, you’re an expert. After reading your book, people might have questions that are gnawing away at them, like, “How do I know if renovating my kitchen will really be worth it?” or “What would really happen if our country really embraced libertarianism, as you recommend?” By providing them with an avenue to ask you these questions – and get responses in real time – you are offering a truly satisfying journey. That can be done via a live expert chat, or simply exchanging comments via Facebook or your blog.

Embrace the fact that people will be in a new and better place in their lives after reading your book. Then, you can start to figure out which of these ideas – or others – will truly make the journey more satisfying. And yes. Like it or not, it is a journey.

SuperwomanSmarts

Case Study: What One Author Website Does Right … and Wrong

SuperwomanSmarts -- an author websiteI stumbled upon a press release this morning about an author website that was just re-launched: www.superwomansmarts.com/.

There are a bunch of things about this site that I like … and a lot of elements that I didn’t have quite as good a reaction to.

Now, I don’t claim to be the final word on this. Some people may disagree with my opinions. But here’s my assessment of what this site does right — and what it does wrong — based on my experience building websites for authors.

What This Author Website Does Right

Design
Whomever designed this site is good. The site was clearly built in WordPress, but with enough customization to really stand out and look different and unique. The site is also mobile-friendly, a huge plus in 2016.

Message clarity
The bulleted list of what Superwoman Smarts has to offer, along with a “welcome” message, is crucial. It allows people to clearly get their bearings when they arrive. Thankfully, this isn’t one of those sites that plops you into the latest blog entry and leaves you trying to figure out what it’s all about.

Video, video, video
Having video on your site is crucial. This site has it front and center as a way for people to understand what the site is about.

Offering benefits for signing up
I have a lot of authors ask me what the secret is to collecting email addresses. The answer? A reason for someone to give you their email address. This site nicely tells people exactly what they’ll get for signing up — from access to podcasts and webinars to private discussion groups that let you connect with other members.

What This Author Website Does Wrong

Now we get to the good stuff, right? Well, here goes…

Serious branding and URL confusion
So you come to SuperwomanSmarts.com, and you think you’re on the site’s homepage. Well, you’re not. And that’s a problem. You see, the main URL for the site is AundreaYWilcox.com. SuperwomanSmarts.com is not its own site — it’s a subsection of Aundrea’s site, and the URL simply directs you to that subpage. Plus, no matter where you click around on the site, the URL is still SuperwomanSmarts.com. And that leads to a whole bunch of confusion. For example:

  • You might wonder, as I initially did, why the header of the site says Aundrea Y. Wilcox if the site name is Superwoman Smarts.
  • Here’s a question: What happens if you click around the site (as I did) and then attempt to go back to the “homepage”? You would click on “home,” right? And then you’d be on Aundrea’s homepage, even though it still says you’re on SuperwomanSmarts.com. Incredibly confusing!
  • There’s clearly some brand confusion here. What is it that we’re supposed to be buying into? SuperwomanSmarts? Or the speaker Aundrea Y. Wilcox? Personally, I think that if Superwoman Smarts is its own brand, then it needs its own site. Period.

Unexpected music
This is just my personal pet peeve, but I can’t stand when you come to a site and it starts blaring music at you. If you accidentally left your sound on and, say, are at work or have a sleeping baby next to you, that’s experience is sure to make you start whispering obscenities at the site. And then leave!

Heavy promotion
Unlike many author websites, this one actually aims not to sell just books, but also retail wear, like t-shirts and the like. And while, if successful, that’s a great idea, I wonder if there’s a little too much pushing of products when you arrive here. After all, the first thing the site needs to do is sell you on the ideas behind it, and once you’re deep enough, it can start encouraging you to spend money on products. Instead, it feels a bit like there’s a huge ad right on the homepage.

Still to Be Determined

Requiring payment
This is honestly one of the boldest things I’ve ever seen done on an author website. Aundrea and Superwoman Smarts (still not clear on which one it is) wants you to “upgrade” and pay for full membership to the site. Here’s the description of what you get with a full membership:

“… upgrade to a VIP Member for $17/month—the cost of a movie ticket and popcorn (and a bottled water if you’re lucky)—and gain expanded access to member detail pages with direct contact information and special offers (and a PREMIUM listing for yourself), live webinars, podcasts, video trainings, the mentoring program, and more exclusive content! If you have the time and the drive to do more with what you have—no matter how little you think you have—these deliverables will help you finally execute on your vision.”

In other words, Superwoman Smarts is offering women the chance to connect with other female professionals, promote their own services, and receive special offers, trainings and professional mentorship if you pay a monthly fee. That’s a tall ask. Personally, I would love to see how many people have already signed up for this. My hunch is that it’s probably not many. But this is something to keep an eye on … because any new way for authors to make money is worth watching.

 

Do you have a site you’d like me to do this type of assessment of? Submit your URL in the comments box below and I’ll be happy to offer my two cents.

Photo credit: Eleaf via Foter.com / CC BY

6 Questions You MUST Ask an Author Website Development Firm

Photo credit: Eleaf via Foter.com / CC BY

Photo credit: Eleaf via Foter.com / CC BY

I’ve been running Smart Author Sites for a decade now. I’ve worked with hundreds of authors (and, truth be told, put together hundreds more proposals than that). Many authors that have come to me have done so after developing a website previously … and then regretting it for one reason or another.

If you are considering having an author website developed, or if you’re talking to an author website development firm, here are five questions you must ask — and answers that should make you run the other way — before signing anything or giving out your credit card number.

  1. Will I be able to update the website myself? When I started this business 10 years ago, content management systems were only used by huge, content-rich sites (like CNN, for example). Now, just about every site is on an easy-to-update content management system, like WordPress. Make sure to ask if the site they will be developing for you will be on a content management system that allows you to easily log in and make changes to the website on your own. It’s essential for authors to be able to log in at any time and post blog entries, site updates, photos, and more.
  2. Is there a charge per page? I’ve actually been asked this question multiple times. At first, it sounded crazy to me. Why would you charge per page? But I’ve come to understand that there are actually companies that charge you on a per page basis for site development. Here’s what you need to know: The significant cost of building a website is in the design and development. That code is then duplicated on each and every page of the site. There might be a small degree of customization that goes into laying out the text and photos in the body of each page, but that’s minimal. In WordPress, adding a page is as simple as clicking a button. So anyone who wants to charge you more for a five-page site than a three-page site is selling you a bag of goods.
  3. Is the site mobile friendly? It’s 2016. A large percentage of people are viewing the web via a mobile phone and/or tablet. For a site to be built today and not be mobile friendly is insane. And yet, this isn’t a crazy question to ask. The same sites that are not built on a content management system (i.e. they are hand-coded) may also not be mobile friendly. So make sure to ask this question and confirm that yours will be before moving forward.
  4. How much will hosting cost me? Have you seen all those commercials in which companies offer to build you a website for free? Have you ever stopped to think how they make money? The answer is: hosting. In other words, they will build you the website for free and then charge you an arm and a leg to keep it up and running after they’ve built it. So make sure you get a price quote on hosting before moving forward with design. Speaking of which …
  5. Who owns the site? So this company will build you the site. Maybe they will build it on their own server. If so, it’s important to make sure that you actually own the site going forward. In other words, let’s say they build you the site, and then let’s say that you decide down the line that you want to have it hosted somewhere else, or have another company manage it for you or make changes to it. Can you do that? If they own the site, you can’t. So this is a crucial thing to know.
  6. What kind of services do you provide post-launch? There are too many design and development firms out there that build you the site, hand it over to you, and wash their hands clean. That’s not a situation you want to be in. What if you need larger-scale design changes made down the line? What if you have a simple question about how to add an image to the page? Make sure that the firm you work with will continue to work with you after the site is launched — helping you keep it fresh and making any changes you need going forward. There may be a small cost associated with that (in our case, the only qualification is that you keep the site hosted with us), but it may well be worth it.

Have you run into any other pitfalls working with companies designing your author website? Any other words of wisdom you’d want to give to other authors? Share them in the comments box below.

Johan Larsson / photo on flickr

Our 5 Most-Read Blog Posts in 2015

Johan Larsson / photo on flickr

Johan Larsson / photo on flickr

A new year has begun, and with it will come a whole new batch of blog posts — chock full of advice, the latest news in the industry and more.

But first, feast on our most-read blog posts of 2015. Please note that not all of these were published in 2015 (some are older than that) … but they certainly were read! We hope these have been helpful to you, and here’s to an even better 2016.

  1. How to Write the Perfect Book Teaser
    When I’m working with an author to create an effective homepage, one of the things that I always ask a writer to do is create a book teaser … something that really whets the appetite of a visitor in the few seconds that you have their attention. Then you give them links to read more about the book, read an excerpt, or … of course … buy the book….

  2. The Importance of an Author Tagline (and How to Write One!)
    Picture this. You go to an author’s website. Or you end up on the website because … well … you’re not quite sure how. The homepage of the website includes the author’s name in huge letters, on top of a large, adorable photo of him or her. “Aw … what a nice photo,” you think…

  3. Authors: Create Your Own Wikipedia Page
    Did you know that Wikipedia is one of the most popular ways of doing research on the web? In some ways, that’s kind of crazy. After all, it’s not experts who post information on Wikipedia — covering everything from the Berlin Wall to the history of the Slinky toy. It’s your average guy who creates a Wikipedia page about something or someone and puts in what they know. Other people can then add to that information. It’s basically a wealth of knowledge from common folk (another example of Web 2.0) that stays there unless someone else finds it to be incorrect…

  4. 6 Things Elizabeth Gilbert Does Right on Her Author Website (and You Can, Too)
    Bestselling author Elizabeth Gilbert (known best for Eat, Pray, Love) has an amazing author website. And no, we didn’t build it. But when I stumbled upon it today, I was immediately impressed by it. Why? Here are six reasons…

  5. Building Your Author Media Page/Press Kit
    Do you have a media page on your author website? It’s purpose is to provide the media with the information they might need to feature you in their next piece. If you decide to have a press page on your website, here are some ideas about what it should include…

  6. Looking to Get Published? Consider Harper Collins’ Authonomy
    If you’re an author looking to get published by a major publishing house, you may want to consider posting your book on Harper Collins’ Authonomy website. Here’s the scoop….

  7. What Is a Book Landing Page and Do You Need One?
    You may or may not have heard the term “landing page” in the context of an author website. But you very well may not know exactly what a landing page is. It’s time to learn!

  8. 6 Tips for Pre-Selling Your Book
    If you’re a smart author — and all our Smart Author Sites clients are 🙂 — you’ll have your website up-and-running well before your book is published. In fact, your website may have even helped to get your book published. But exactly what should an author be doing with the website for the months leading up to the book’s release date? How do you promote a book that’s not on the shelves yet? Here’s what you can do to get a head start selling copies of your book…

  9. Author Newsletters: Tips, Misconceptions, and More!
    Several of my clients have asked me to send out newsletters to their mailing lists recently. But none of them seemed to understand exactly what a newsletter can do (or the information you can cull out of sending a newsletter). With that in mind, I thought it might be helpful to outline exactly what an author newsletter can do, when it should be used, and what kind of information you can cull from it…

  10. A New Way for Authors to Get ‘Discovered’
    I came across this article today on MediaBistro. Just thought I’d share it with my author friends. Apparently, Penguin has created a new website called Book Country — a place where authors can connect with reviewers, publishing professionals, and readers…

Have an idea for a future blog entry you’d like to see? Make your recommendation in the comments section below.

new-years-eve

5 Author Website-Related New Year’s Resolutions

new-years-eve2016 is rapidly approaching, and with a new year comes new goals, new technologies and new promises. With that in mind, here are five things that authors might consider making their new year’s resolution.

1. I will blog/update my site regularly. There’s a reason this is the first potential resolution on the list. This is where I see the most authors getting lax, or letting things slide. I regularly see blogs that haven’t been updated in months, or “upcoming events” listed that have dates long in the past. Look, it’s hard to stay on top of these types of things. After all, authors have a lot of other things to do. But consider this: if you visited a website and saw that it hadn’t been updated in a while, what would your reaction be? Probably something like, “If he/she isn’t paying attention to it, why should I?” That in and of itself is enough reason for you to make sure your website is always current, and looks like it’s tended to.

2. I will make sure my site is mobile-friendly. Mobile is taking over the world. Seriously. The number of mobile users has grown tremendously in the past few years, and it’s only continuing to get larger. Whether it’s phones or tablets, a large percentage of web users nowadays are not using a desktop computer with a large screen. So when is the last time you looked at your site on a mobile device? How about multiple mobile devices (say, an iPhone and a tablet)? If your site doesn’t offer the optimal user experience on those devices, then you should make your goal for 2015 to make sure that every mobile user has as good an experience on your site as a desktop user.

3. I will begin adding video to my website. I recently posted another entry on video. And, if you haven’t gotten into video yet, the numbers are pretty scary. In short, video is the future of the web. As much as you and I may be “authors” (i.e. people of the written word), we will fall behind the times unless we start thinking about ways to incorporate video into our author websites.  Whether they’re vlogs, book trailers or curated YouTube videos, don’t let video pass you by this upcoming year.

4. I will take an objective look at my site. When you look at your author website on a regular basis, it’s hard to know what it looks like to new users. It’s kind of like your spouse: he or she may look beautiful to you every day, because you don’t notice that receding hairline or those few extra pounds. But to someone new, those things might be evident. In other words, take a step back and look at your website like you’re seeing it for the first time. Does the design look current? Is it clear at first glance what kind of writer you are? Does the tagline you put under your name still apply? Is there anything on the site that looks out of place? Sometimes, it helps to step away for a little bit before you come back with fresh eyes. You may be surprised at what you see.

5. I will think about new ways to make my site interesting. This is where I stop giving you specific ideas and toss the ball into your court. The best author websites are the ones in which the authors have started their own trends. Maybe they are asking readers to vote on a title for their next book. Maybe they’re running a writing contest for aspiring writers in their genre. Maybe they’re doing live video chats with users, answering questions. The ideas are endless, and it’s up to you to come up with them. So make a resolution to think outside the box this upcoming year and make your site one that others will want to emulate.

Happy New Year, everyone!