author website analytics

Your Author Website Analytics: What It May Be Telling You

author website analyticsAre you looking at your author website analytics? What is it telling you? Might you be missing some important clues?

I’ve written other blog posts before about viewing analytics. I’ve talked about what to look at and what it means. After all, too many authors can’t really tell you what “bounce rate” is or how to define a conversion. But that’s not the point of this post. No, what I’m talking about today is some of the hidden messages that you might not notice when you look at your analytics report.

Here are a few things to keep an eye out for on your author website analytics report, and what those stats might really mean…

1. Total visitors over the last six months. Total visitors is probably the thing that everyone looks at first in their author website analytics. But have you looked at it as a trend? Compare this month to last month. Then compare it to six months ago. Occasionally, you may want to compare it to a year ago. Only by looking at this data over a period of time can you pinpoint if you’re getting better or worse in terms of traffic. You may also want to look at your traffic on a daily basis. What was your highest trafficked day of the month? What do you think made it the highest? This can be a clue to what’s working and what’s not on the traffic driving front.

2. Site content. This allows you to see the pages on your site that get the most traffic. And what’s here might surprise you. For example, you may discover that a whopping amount of your traffic goes to the homepage. Other authors see exactly the opposite: they notice that their blog posts are the primary traffic drivers and that hardly anyone even sees their homepage. This can give you a clue as to how people are finding your site and what they’re doing when they’re there.

3. Time on site/bounce rate. It’s great that you’re getting traffic to your site. But are those people staying on the site? Your author website analytics report will tell you how long people stay per visit, how many pages they visit, on average, and how many people “bounce” (i.e. visit one page and then leave). This will give you a good idea of your website’s stickiness. In other words, if they’re simply arriving and leaving (i.e. bouncing) you may not be doing a good enough job selling yourself or your book.

4. Exit rate per page. Similar to time on site, this data can tell you which pages on your site people are leaving. In other words, if you notice that 70% of the people that leave your site do so from the “About the author” page, then maybe that means that the page doesn’t have enough links on it. Or maybe it doesn’t entice people to learn more after they’ve reached the bottom. By really studying which pages people are leaving, you can figure out where to focus your efforts to keep people engaged.

5. New vs. returning users. How many people visited your site last month? How many people visited more than once? This is an important metric, because it tells you whether people are stumbling upon your site by accident or if they intentionally come back on a regular basis because you had an impact on them. The most common reason for return visitors on author sites is a strong blog series and/or email newsletter. If one of your goals is to develop a fanbase that will follow you, then having a low percentage of returning users should be a concern.

6. Technology. What platforms are people visiting your site on? What platforms are they LEAVING your site on? In other words, if 55% of people visit your site on mobile and the exit rate on mobile is significantly higher than desktop, then that may be a sign that your site isn’t easily usable to the mobile audience.

7. Acquisition channels. Where is your traffic coming from? In an ideal world, your traffic is nicely divided among the three primary sources: organic search, social and direct traffic (i.e. people typing in your URL). The reason it’s nice to have these balanced is that if one falls off, your site still has other traffic sources. So if, for example, Google changes their algorythm and your site falls from page 1 to page 5 on a search result, you will still have social to keep you afloat. If you look at these stats and one is significantly higher than the other two, you might want to invest some time in finding a better balance.

8. Site speed. I talk about site speed a lot. That’s because so many authors I’ve worked with value site design over site speed. But a slow site can seriously increase your bounce rate. It can also hurt your Google search results placement. If you haven’t taken a look at your site speed in your author website analytics report, now’s the time to do so. Make sure to delve into average site speed, site speed per page AND your site speed on different browsers. The numbers may surprise you.

9. Conversion rate. Many authors I work with don’t define a conversion on their site. And that’s quite a missed opportunity. Whether you consider a successful visit a book purchase, an email sign-up or something else entirely, how do you know if your site is achieving its goals unless you clearly define a conversion and track who converts? This can easily be set up in your author website analytics report. Keep an eye on your conversion data to keep track of what percentage of visitors are converting, which pages they tend to visit before converting, etc… This data can give you worlds of knowledge!

See, there’s probably a lot you can learn about what’s working — and what’s not — on your author website. You just have to know how to interpret the data.

If you want help getting your Google Analytics report set up properly, and help interpreting it, contact us today for a free consultation.

 

 

adding a new book to your footer

5 Steps to Adding a New Book to an Author Website

So you built that author website when you published your first book. Now you have a second (or third or fourth) coming out. Do you need to scrap that old site entirely? Probably not. Here are the five steps to updating your author website when you are adding a new book.

Tips for Adding a New Book

1. Consider the domain and design. Was your original site designed for your first book? Or was it more broad, focusing on you as an author? If the answer is the former, you may have some work on your hands. In other words, if the site was named after your first book and uses all the images/photography/colors from that first book cover, you really should consider some rebranding of the site before adding a new book. That might mean changing the domain name, imagery and/or the color scheme. This is why I frequently advise authors that unless this book is the only thing they are ever going to write, they should build a site that can easily encompass future books as well.

2. Reorganize your homepage. Your homepage is probably built to promote your first book. Maybe it includes the book cover, a blurb about the book, a testimonial or two and links to learn more. Now that you have another book out, you may decide that you want to give the homepage a similar treatment, but with more prominence for your new book. Or you may decide that you want a rotating slider on the homepage that features one book at a time but shifts from one to another. A third option is to have the homepage include a blurb about you and what you write about (assuming both books can fall under the same umbrella) and then call out each book as a subset of that larger message. Either way, you want to make sure your newest title gets the prominence it deserves on your homepage.

adding a new book to your footer3. Adjust your book promo/buy the book modules. You probably have a header bar, a right rail or a footer that appears on every page of the site and includes some sort of book call-out. Often it includes the cover, links to learn more about it and/or a “buy the book” link. But now you have two (or more) books to feature. So you may want to consider either adding a new book to that module, or redesigning it so that it can naturally encompass more than one title. In some cases, that means making the first cover smaller and giving the newer title more prominence.

4. Add a new book page.
This one is obvious, but it’s not to be forgotten. Each book you write deserves its own page on the site. Take a look at what you have for your first book and replicate it for the second. Maybe it’s a page that includes a detailed book description, a link to a featured excerpt, testimonials, etc… Aim to populate as much of that content as possible on your new book page as well. You may not have all that information handy yet (testimonials aren’t always readily available pre-pub), but you can always add them later. And if your first book has all of that information divided into multiple pages on the site, you may want to consider combining it all. Now that you’re a multi-book author, you want to make it as easy as possible for people to find all the information for an individual title in one place.

adding a new book to your navigation5. Restructure your navigation. Chances are, when you built the navigation on your site, you didn’t have a page title that matched the first book title. In other words, if your first book was called “Rose Petals” you may not have literally had a page called “Rose Petals.” You may instead have had a page called “About the book” or “Featured excerpts.” Now that you are adding a new book, you will need to clearly retitle each book page so that it matches the book title. You might also want to consider having the tab that’s visible in the navigation be called something more like “Books” and allowing each book that you have to be a subpage that appears when you scroll over the “books” tab (see right). This type of set-up will allow to add even more books in the future with little to no hassle.

Voila! These five steps will take your author website from a one-book site to a multi-book site. You may, of course, have additional updates that you want made. After all, each and every site is different. But these basic changes should ensure that once your newest visitors have arrived, they will be able to see that you are a multi-book author … and most importantly, to learn about (and hopefully buy) your newest book.

author reads april 2017

April Round-Up: 5 Author Reads Worth Your Time

author reads april 2017April showers bring May flowers. Or, in this case, good author reads from April (will hopefully) bring some additional book sales this month.

But seriously, here’s a recap of the five author reads you might have missed in April. Now’s your time to catch up.

Can’t Miss Author Reads

1. How to Create a Review Campaign for Your Book Launch
What you need is a system to ensure you’re predictably and steadily bringing in reviews from the moment you hand out your first advance reader copy (ARC). So, let’s get to it.
Book Marketing Tools | April 10, 2017

2. DIY: Book Awards for Self-Published Authors
With hundreds of thousands of self-published books hitting the virtual shelves every year, indie authors need to find ways of standing out.
Publishers Weekly | April 10, 2017

3. Authors: Don’t Make Your Social Media All About You
I get it. In the hyper-competitive world of social media, it seems counter intuitive to use one’s precious bandwidth to promote something other than your own work. But it works, and here’s why.
Joel Pitney | April 11, 2017

4. A Quick Guide to Pricing Your E-Book
There’s one question that we editors hear again and again from self-publishing writers we work wit: How much should I charge for my ebook?
Build Book Buzz | April 19, 2017

5. Author Pages: 5 Sites You Should Consider Having One on
Here are five sites you should consider having an author page on – including Amazon and Facebook – and tips on how to maximize each one.
Smart Author Sites | April 24, 2017

If you read any articles recently that you think would be helpful to other start-up authors, share them below in the comments box. You can never have too many!

Happy book selling, and happy May.

An Author Website Book Publishers Will Love

I work with authors at all different stages of publication. Some who are self publishing. Others who reach out to me when their books are only a few months away from release through a major publishing house. The saddest of all are the authors whose books came out six months ago, and only now are they realizing how little publicity their book publishers are doing for them.

But some authors actually reach out to me way sooner than that. In fact, many of them haven’t even finished their manuscript yet.

How Soon Is Too Soon to Build an Author Website?

I’ve written about this before. It’s honestly never too soon. But be aware that the website you build prior to finishing your book is going to be drastically different from what it will be a year later. Once you have a finished book (and cover), book reviews, testimonials, links to buy it, etc… the site will look different because your goals will be different. At that point, you will be aiming to get readers to buy your book. But now, you have nothing to buy.

That doesn’t mean, however, that you shouldn’t have a site this early in the process. Building an online presence is an important piece of being a successful author today, and that’s something that takes time.

So What’s the Site for If It’s Not Selling Books?

Well, some of that depends on if you’re self publishing or reaching out to book publishers. In the case of traditional publishing, you want to make sure that when the person who receives your book pitch takes a look at your site, they are impressed and think, “Now, that’s an author I want to get behind.” More on that below.

Obviously, if you’re planning to self publish, you will be less focused on appealing to book publishers. But in many ways, the goals of the site would still be the same.

This early in the journey, the goal of your author website should be to build a following. That can be done in a few different ways, including:

  • Blogging regularly
  • Driving traffic to the site through Facebook/Twitter
  • Collecting email addresses and building fans/followers
  • Optimizing your site for search terms that readers might be looking for

So What Type of Site Would Appeal to Book Publishers?

Author websites for book publishers

Image courtesy of adamr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Put yourself in the shoes of someone who is receiving your manuscript. Let’s call her Jane.

Picture this scenario….

Jane comes across your book pitch. She sees your name and does a Google search for you.

Does your site show up right at the top of search results for your name?

Jane is now clicking around your site. The first thing she wants to know is if this site looks clean and professional.

Did you have it designed by a professional? Is it mobile-friendly?

Jane now wants to know what you look like. After all, she likes to attach a face to a name and is curious whether you’re 25 or 65.

Do you have a professional photo of yourself on the site?

Now, Jane is going to take a look at your blog. She wants to know what you write about, how dedicated you seem to be to it, and if people seem to be visiting it regularly.

Do you post entries on your blog on a regular basis? Are people commenting, and are you replying?

While she’s at it, Jane wants to get an idea of if you’ve already built a list of followers/subscribers. The more people you already have following you the easier it will be to sell the book to a larger audience once it’s published.

Do you prominently collect email addresses on the site? Do you have a social widget that shows how many followers/fans you already have?

Now, let’s not forget your writing. Jane knows that your book pitch is good, but how does she know that you did that yourself and didn’t hire someone? She wants to know what writing you’ve done in the past and where you might have been published.

Do you have a page on your site dedicated to previous writings (articles, book chapters, etc…) and a place where they can be read? Do you highlight any writing awards you’ve received?

 

If you answered yes to most of the questions above, a book publisher like Jane is more likely to take you seriously. Now, that doesn’t mean she’s going to publish your book. That’s still a ways away. But if, at the end of the day, she’s deciding between two promising authors and you’ve checked more boxes above than the other author she’s considering, you have a serious advantage.

Happy site building!

facebook author page

Author Page: 5 Sites You Should Consider Having One On

I often hear the term “author page” thrown around by clients as something they should have. I think it’s important that I first define what an author page is — and why it’s not the same thing as an author website.

The term author page refers to one page on the web that is dedicated to an individual author. It generally highlights who they are, what they write about, and why a reader might be interested in becoming a fan. This is not to be confused with an author site, which is generally comprised of many elements.

With that in mind, here are five sites that you should consider having an author page on (and tips on how to maximize each one).

Sites for Your Author Page

1. Your author website. As I alluded to above, an author page is a subset of an author site. Think of it like a thumb being a type of finger. You have five fingers on your hand, one of them is a thumb. You have an author website with many pages, one of them being an author page. Your entire site will likely be comprised of a blog, pages dedicated to your books, a contact page, a media page, etc… And yes, an author page.

Tip: Learn more about how to create a great author bio on your own website.

amazon author page2. Amazon. If you have books for sale on Amazon, you absolutely need an author page on Amazon as well. This will allow your name (wherever it appears on Amazon) to serve as a link to your author page. Once someone arrives there, they can view your photo, your bio, a list of all your books available for sale, and highlights of the reviews your books have gotten on Amazon. It essentially becomes a one-stop shop where people can learn more about you and your writing. And best of all, it’s free. You can start by joining Amazon Author Central.

Tip: In addition to all the basic information, your Amazon author page can also be customized to include a blog feed (pulling in your most recent blog entries), details on upcoming book tours, and any video you’ve created. Plus, on the back end, it allows you to access a book sales tracker and see how your books are doing in real time.

3. GoodReads. Much like Amazon, building an author page on GoodReads is free. All you have to do is join their author program. By creating this page, you are essentially claiming your space on GoodReads. Not only will this mean people learning about your books will also be able to learn about you, but it will also provide you with the official Goodreads Author badge that will appear anywhere you post on the site — like answering reader questions or reviewing other books in your genre. Fans will then also be able to follow you on Goodreads.

Tip: There are various book marketing tools that also become available when you build an author page on GoodReads, like being able to run a book giveaway or advertise your books through the site.

facebook author page4. Facebook. You probably already have a personal profile on Facebook. But what you may not have is an author page. And it’s important that you understand the difference. Unlike a Facebook profile, which is for an individual and allows you to friend people, like posts, etc… a Facebook page is defined as “a business account that represents a company or organization. [It] allows businesses to promote specials and contests to followers who have engaged with their page by ‘liking’ it.” In this case, your business is your authorship, and it needs a page that both friends and fans can follow. Another way to put it is that while your Facebook profile has friends, your Facebook page has followers. This is also free to create.

Tip: Make sure to take advantage of Facebook Insights, which you get when you set up an author page. It allows you to track how successful your social media efforts are. It also allows you to schedule posts in advance, launch contests, or run Facebook ads (not free).

5. Your publisher’s site Depending on who published your book — and even if you published it yourself — the publisher’s site is likely to have a place where you can create your own author page. This probably won’t be your most heavily-trafficked author page, but there’s no harm in getting it set up. Make sure to ask your publisher or self-publishing company if and how you can go about creating this page on their site.

Tip: Given the fact that you’re unlikely to spend a lot of time working on maintaining this author page, I highly recommend that you work in a link to your author website somewhere on the page. That way, a visitor who wants to stay on top of what you’re doing knows where to go.

Which author page worked best for you? What tips would you give other authors? Share them with us!

stopwatch-to-speed-up-your-author-website

7 Ways to Speed Up Your Author Website

stopwatch-to-speed-up-your-author-websiteSo your site is loading slowly. You’re not alone. Nearly everyone — from time to time — has dealt with a slow-loading site that is turning off potential readers. In fact, here’s a stat that you should be aware of: according to a report by the Microsoft Bing search team, a 2-second longer delay in page responsiveness reduced user satisfaction by 3.8%, increased lost revenue per user by 4.3%, and a reduced clicks by 4.3%. So how do you speed up your author website?

If your site was built in WordPress (which most author websites are), there are some simple steps you can take to make your site load faster.

Tips to Speed Up Your Author Website (in WordPress)

1. Uninstall unused plug-ins. Each plug-in that you have slows down your site just a bit. So go through your list of installed plug-ins and remove any that you aren’t currently using.

2. Make sure your images are optimized. If you are displaying a photo at a width of, say 450 pixels, make sure that the version that you’ve uploaded is not, say, 2000 pixels. The larger the original version of the image (even if you’re not displaying it at its full size) the longer the page will take to load.

3. Consider choosing a lighter WordPress theme. The more designed (i.e. full of code) your site is, the longer it takes to load. Consider switching to a faster theme. You’ll have fewer bells and whistles in the design, but it can be much more functional.

4. Install a caching plug-in. Okay, this probably sounds contrary to the “remove unused plug-ins” I discussed before, but this plug-in serves one purpose: to cache your site and improve site speed. One that is frequently recommended is W3 Total Cache.

5. Reduce content on your homepage. Each element on your homepage is its own widget. So if, for example, you have an introductory paragraph, a feed of your most recent blog posts, followed by a slider of photos, etc… each one of those is its own widget, and each comes with a boatload of code. If you can simplify/reduce the amount of content on your homepage, you can drastically increase load time.

6. Optimize your WordPress database. Yes, this is yet another plug-in. But I promise. These are helpful. This one helps optimize all your files to help reduce site load time. So if you have, say, 10 drafts of an old blog post or 100 spam comments in the system, those might be slowing down your site. Try the WP-Optimize plug-in.

7. Consider changing web hosts. This is probably your least attractive option. Because, let’s face it, who wants to have to move to a new host? But if all of the above options don’t work, the problem may just be your server. If so, it might be worth moving your site to a new host that gets good reviews from users on site speed.

It’s important to know that you can always track your progress on site speed as you take each of these steps. Use Google PageSpeed Insights to get real-time data on your load time (both on desktop and mobile) and watch your numbers increase.

Happy (and speedy) loading.

good reads for authors

March in Review: 5 Good Reads for Authors

good reads for authorsHappy April! Here’s what you might have missed in March. It’s time to catch up on your reading. Presenting … 5 Good Reads for Authors

Good Reads for Authors, March 2017

1. Should Indie Authors Publish Exclusively With Amazon or Not?
A new report from Author Earnings doesn’t completely answer the question, but it will help writers decide.
March 6, 2017 | Observer

2. 6 book publishing models in 2017
Discover today’s six book publishing models and get advice on how to figure out whose book publishing advice you can trust
March 8, 2017 | Build Book Buzz

3. The Indie Author’s Guide to Paid Reviews
For indie authors who have some room in their marketing budgets, paid book review services can be an appealing option.
March 10, 2017 | Publishers Weekly

4. Why Is It Important to Write Unique Blog Content?
There will always be room for another blog, but you cannot get away with poorly written content anymore. Writing unique and informative posts is where the money is at.
March 17, 2017 | Just Publishing Advice

4. Author Marketing Plans: Why Yours Should Be Unique
Are you looking for ready-made author marketing plans? Hoping to find a simple checklist that tells you everything you need to do to get your book out there to a wide audience? Well, sorry … I have some bad news for you.
March 23, 2017 | Smart Author Sites

articles for authors

Articles for Authors: What You Might Have Missed in February

articles for authors

Image courtesy of adamr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Happy March, everyone.  Since February came and went so quickly, you may have missed some of these really helpful articles for authors – put together from various places across the web. Here are five our our favorites.

5 Must-Read Articles for Authors

  1. The Indie Author’s Guide to Customer Reviews
    How indie authors can turn that discouraging “no customer reviews yet” message into star ratings and commentary.
    Publishers Weekly, February 1, 2017
  2. Are You Confusing Your Readers?
    Here are five signs you might be confusing readers with your book’s category and description. If you confuse readers, you’ll also cripple sales.
    Build Book Buzz, February 8, 2017
  3. Writing an Effective Book Description: 7 Ways to Turn Browsers Into Buyers
    Today I share 7 tips on how to write a book description that will turn browsers into buyers.
    Karen Woodward, February 14, 2017
  4. The 7 Benefits Of Inviting Guest Authors To Your Blog
    Attracting guest posts to your blog, written by outsiders, is a strategy of enormous potential value. Here are seven reasons why.
    Forbes, February 15, 2017
  5. I Want to Stop Blogging. Now What?
    Here are three questions I frequently get when people want to stop blogging, and what you as an author need to know about cutting ties with your blog.
    Smart Author Sites, February 16, 2017

Happy Reading!

good reads for authors

Good Reads for Authors from January (No Pun Intended)

good reads for authors

Image courtesy of bplanet at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Another month has come and gone. And with that in mind, here’s a list of the good reads (and no, I don’t mean GoodReads) for authors and writers that were published in January. If you missed any of these, now’s the time to go back and make sure you don’t miss them.

January in Review: 5 Good Reads for Authors

1. Memoir Author’s Book Marketing Success Story
Jen Miller leveraged her platform, skills, and experience to turn her memoir launch into abook marketing success story. Here’s how she did it.
BuildBookBuzz, January 4, 2017

2. Building a Platform to Land a Book Deal: Why It Often Fails
If you’re preparing to pitch your nonfiction work to agents or publishers, you’ve probably heard about the necessity of having a platform.
JaneFriedman.com, January 5, 2017

3. 8 Book Marketing Mistakes to Ban in 2017
Avoid the most common book marketing blunders made by self-publishing authors.
Reedsy.com, January 10, 2017

4. 10 Times Book Reviewers Totally Got It Wrong
I love reading book reviews but I always take them with a grain of salt. Thing is, no matter how much of an expert the reviewer is, a review is an opinion, not a fact.
#AmReading, January 24, 21017

5. Author Tip Sheet: The Whys and Hows
You may have heard about an author tip sheet, sometimes called an author sell sheet. But what in the world is it? Let’s answer some of your questions.
SmartAuthorSites.com, January 26, 2017

Happy February, everyone! If you come across other good reads for authors this month, please share them with us.

how do you track book sales

How Do You Track Book Sales?

how do you track book salesSo you have an author website. And you, of course, have links to buy your book through your website (or at least I hope you do!) But how do you track book sales? In other words, how do you know if people are actually clicking on those links? And how do you know how many books are being sold?

There are actually few options for doing this.

How Do You Track Book Sales From Your Site?

Yes, you can track how many people are clicking on each of your “Buy the book” links. You can even track where they are clicking on them (From your blog? The book description page?) and which particular link they are going to (Amazon Kindle? B&N? Your hardcover?)

All of this can be done relatively simply – and for free – through a redirect URL or WordPress plug-in. This means that you can create a custom, hidden URL for each link that then redirects to the actual link. So, in other words, you could create a “page” on your site – let’s call it /buy-amazon-hardcover – that immediately redirects to your hardcover page on Amazon. No user clicking on the link would ever see that “blank” page on your site, because they’re only on it for a millisecond before they’re redirected to Amazon. But your site analytics records that visit, and any time you log in to view your analytics you can find out how many people actually went there — or, in layman’s terms, clicked on that particular Amazon link.

As I mentioned before, there are simple WordPress plugins that can do this work for you as well. The one we’ve used is called Redirection and it automates the process of creating these redirect URLs.

But here’s one thing this free functionality doesn’t do: let you know if people actually went through with the purchase. In other words, it tells you if people clicked on the link from your site that took them to the page on Amazon where they could buy the book. What it doesn’t tell you is if those same people actually followed through with the purchase.

How Do You Track Book Sales in Total?

So now we’ve talked about tracking how many books you’ve sold through your site. But what about tracking book sales in total? You clearly want to know how many books you’re selling, regardless of where the buyers are coming from.

The free option for doing this can be pretty time consuming. Essentially, any site where your book is sold will allow you to view that data. Your Amazon Author Central account will essentially allow you to view how many copies of your book were sold on Amazon – as well as some other partner sites.

But I still hear from authors that their sales through Smashwords, etc… are not included in these reports. They find themselves looking at multiple sources to figure out how many copies they’ve sold, and then working to crunch all the numbers into one place. Not fun.

Thankfully, there are several paid services that help you track all your book sales in one place without the legwork.

One is called Shelley Hitz. It allows you to enter your book information from multiple sites that sell it (Amazon, Smashwords, etc…) and it will generate all the data for you. It allows you to try it for free for 14 days and then the cost is anywhere up to $9.99/month (depending on how many books you’re tracking the sales of).

Another similar option is the downloadable Story Box Software. It offers similar features and allows you to run reports, download your data into Excel files, etc…. The difference with this service is that there’s a one-time fee to download it — $89.99 – and then you can use it for as long as you need. It also offers a free trial.

I’m sure there are plenty more websites, apps, etc… that can help with this. These are just the ones I’ve heard of through word of mouth.

So how do you track book sales? Well, there are a variety of options. It all depends on what you want to know, how you want to get that information, and – like everything else in life — how much you’re willing to pay for it.